View From the Hudson
premiered February, 2002
45 minutes

Choreography by Randy James
Original Music Score by Tigger Benford
Costumes by Cindy Capraro
Scenic and Lighting Design by John Lasiter


A reflection of the events of September 11th. Commissioned by the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation with original music by Tigger Benford, this piece explores many subjects relating to the terrorist attacks, "intriguingly close to abstraction," while still giving the audience the tools to draw conclusions and be moved in a personal way.

"A delicate task, interpreting the horrors of terrorist attacks…one was content to be rocked gently by the dance's ripples of inscrutable emotions."
- Jennifer Dunning, The New York Times
 



       
       
  Without Direct Contact
premiered June, 2001
23 minutes

Choreography by Randy James
Original Music Score by Robert Maggio (Two Quartets)
Costumes by Kim Lennox
Lighting Design by John Lasiter


In a quartet that explores themes of connection and alienation, this highly physical dance shows four individuals who both stand apart as well as share the burden of each other's weight. An original score by Robert Maggio supplies the background for this dance of extremes.


 
       
       
  Looking East
premiered June, 2000
60 minutes

Choreography by Randy James
Original Music Score by Jason Berg
Costumes by Kim Lennox and Nancy Swolensky

Lighting and Scenery by John Lasiter

Looking East is an American's view of Japan and Japanese culture created after James' own journey to Japan. This multi-textured, full-length piece explores many facets of Japan including Sumo Wrestling, Kabuki Theater, the subway pushers, Butoh, Ikebana (flower arranging), Buddhist and Shinto rituals, and the society of the Japanese family. The dance is not a "Japanese dance", but a series of impressions and feelings after James' immersion into a beautiful, unfamiliar culture, exploring simplicity that we find out is truly complex past the first glance. Looking East is performed by 8 dancers in two acts.

"Danced to the hilt…Mr. James creates strikingly handsome patterns and imagery…bold
lithe dancers"
- Jennifer Dunning, The New York Times.

"Stunningly thoughtful work…a magical moment"
- Karyn Collins, The Home News and Tribune.

"the dance focused on elegant details and breathed a delicate atmosphere…soothing and sensual as well as exuberant."
- Robert Johnson, The Star Ledger.
 



       
       
  Moonlight Sonata
premiered October, 1998
16 minutes

Choreography by Randy James
Music: Beethoven (Piano Sonata Op.27 No.2)
Costumes by Kim Lennox
Lighting by Donald Holder


This work was created for four performers in three parts - solo for a woman, duet for a man and woman, and a quartet for two men and two women - and was inspired by Beethoven's musical masterpiece. The dance is an intensely personal expression based on Mr. James' childhood remembrance of his mother repeatedly playing his favorite piece of music on the piano in order to escape from life's hardships while expressing emotions of anger, despair and love.

"the second movement's duet is particularly strong"
- Mac Nelson, the Dunkirk Observer.
 
       
       
  Waves at My Back
premiered October, 1998
16 minutes

Choreography by Randy James
Music: Bach (Concerto No. 1 in D minor)
Costumes by Kim Lennox
Lighting Design by Donald Holder

Bach's stirring Concerto in D minor for three pianos and string orchestra complements a highly physical dance for seven in three sections. Exploring the movement possibilities of the energy that is at our backs and challenging the viewers' perceptions of risky lifts, falls and reaches, this lively dance is filled with buoyant optimism.

"Interesting and complex…filled with breezy entrances and exits"
- Jack Anderson, The New York Times.
 
       
       
 

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
premiered January, 1998
70 minutes

Choreography by Randy James
Music: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Costumes by Kim Lennox
Scenery and Lighting by John Evans

This family-oriented modern dance adaptation of C.S. Lewis' The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is performed with a cast of fifteen dancers. The classic tale beautifully lends itself to dance interpretation through a myriad of visual and literary analogies. Richly woven with social, religious, and political interplay, this work has been enjoyed by audiences of all ages. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, with its life-affirming, accessible message, can also be presented in 50 minutes for in-school performances.

"An Absolute Masterpiece"
- Karyn Collins, The Home News and Tribune

"James has done an outstanding job adapting this tale for the stage…James, a dancemaker whose spirit seems to revel in good-natured choreographic hijinks, has a winner in this delightful children's fable"
- Robert Johnson, The Star Ledger.

 
       
       
  Endured Lull
Premiered October, 1993
9 minutes

Choreography by Randy James
Music by Scott Buch
Costumes by Margaret Shyne Benson
Lighting by Donald Holder


Explores awkwardness between two men, what ensues in the struggle of relating
to one another, building to a confrontation, and coping with resolution. This duet is performed partly in silence, music by Scott Buch.
 
       
       
  With Alligators in the Bayou (you waterski real good)
premiered 1994
20 minutes

Choreography by Randy James
Music by Buckwheat Zydeco
Costumes by Margaret Shyne Benson
Lighting by Donald Holder


With propulsive and soulful music by Buckwheat Zydeco, an exciting group work examines rural life in a one stop-light town in Louisiana. A quartet for four women portrays the hard physical labor of rural life, while a quartet for men shows the flipside of lazy days rolling around in the hay. Meanwhile, a lone girl desperately dreams of love with a forbidden older man and in the end, they all know how to "pass a good time".

"a high energy hoe-down...happy exhausting workout that was fun to watch"
- Jennifer Dunning, The New York Times.

"James not only shows us the good ol' foot-shaking, bounding through the air good times of life on the bayou, but lets us feel the unbearably hot sun that beats down on the back and makes life slow to a crawl"
- Karyn Collins, The Home News and Tribune.
 
       
       
  Susie and Swoosie's Soiree
premiered 1994
19 minutes

Choreography by Randy James
Music: Tommy Edwards & Tommy Smith
Costumes by Margaret Shyne Benson
Lighting by Donald Holder


A formal dinner party thrown by two eccentric sisters provides the background for this lighthearted peek into mixed social graces with music by Tommy Edwards and Tommy Smith. With guests arriving embarrassingly early and fashionably late, the scene is set for hilarious interactions in this RJDW signature work that is terrifically goofy and is a guaranteed crowd pleaser.

"New Jersey's liveliest dance ensemble...exquisite detail"
- Elizabeth Zimmer, The Village Voice.

"a magical combination - James' trademark physicality peppered with fine details that forced one to look beyond the bigger picture and see personalities and humor"
- Karyn Collins, The Home News and Tribune.